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20130117
20130117
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of violence. >> are you optimistic alexis? >> i think there is still a lot of work to do, work to do in terms of other proposals. but in general, i am optimistic. i think this is an opportunity to make real change happen. >> colin, the vice president mentioned you by name. what's your reaction again to what you heard today? >> that was quite shocking to hear my name mentioned by that. overall, highly encouraged by the leadership from the white house on this issue coupled with the overwhelming support from grassroots people from across the country, including gun owners and nra members who have reached out saying what you are talking about makes sense. we think coming from the top down and working from the bottom up, it's going to lead to some positive change in the country. >> you are part of the brady campaign. you fight for gun control measureses. it has become a very personal calling for you. do you think that the president can legislatively get through an assault weapons ban? >> i think we need to look at all the proposals that he is putting out there. if we get success on any one of those
expect quite a bit. >> thank you so much from new york. alexis wineman grew up knowing she was not like other kids, but not until she turned 11 she found out why. the story of this girl who did not let her disorder get in the way of her dreams. >> miss montana surrounded by 50 other beauty queens on stage. all hoping to become miss america. for most of her early life. alexis wineman spent time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong, but the small town didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at the age of 11 after years and years of searching for answers, a doctor put a name to wineman's condition. pervasive development disorder, a mild form of autism. >> children with autism are very intelligent, but very quiet and socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't become beauty queens either, but one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to accept myse
, the personal. two takes on what happened at the white house today. alexy haller, the uncle of noah pozner. along with colin goddard. colin was shot four times in a classroom at virginia tech. i was wondering what your reaction was to what you heard. >> based on what we heard before the announcement when the families met with the president and the vice president and during the announcement itself, i was satisfied and pleased to see that the administration is treating this so seriously. and i think the strong sense i got was that they were determined to make a major change here and to enact significant reforms that would put a stop to this kind of violence. >> are you optimistic? >> i'm optimistic to some of the proposals. i still think there is a lot of work to do. i still think there is work to do in terms of other proposals. but in general i am optimistic. i think that this is an opportunity to make real change happen. >> colin, the vice president mentioned you by name. what is your reaction to what you heard today? >> that was quite shocking to hear my name mentioned like that. but over
with a young student. >> everyone needs to read that letter. it is shocking. >> alexis, are you here? you want to come up here? come on. don't be shy, nobody's going to bite. >> let's give her some encouragement here. we've heard from adults all day long, we want to hear from somebody who is -- come over here, young lady. my name is cheryl, thank you for being here. we have some great guests who care about you, everybody in this room cares about you. you have been through some training. you have a question for our guests? >> no, but i want to thank you for doing this. thank you. without this we'd be back at scare one. >> thank you. >> have you seen bullying at your school? can you tell us a little about that? >> i don't have bullying like at the movie but it's kind of like, oh, she wore this, so. >> did somebody in your school do something about it? >> not really. the teachers don't see it. >> nobody wants to say anything to the teachers so they don't think this is a big deal. >> yeah. >> you've been through training to stop bullying so what does that mean? >> we'll try to stop it
. alexis has called in from gaithersburg, maryland. if you would like a tote bag, that is yours for a contribution of $100. we tote these bags from all over the country. a very sturdy canvas bag. the statue of liberty, democracy now! on one side. to live tv. independent radio, tv news on the other. another phone call from new york. we have gotten calls from pr. karen has call from california. karen is getting a copy of "static." i will sign the copy for you. the book is yours. i wrote it with david goodman. it is yours for a $25 contribution. you can get my latest book, "the silenced majority." that book can be yours for a $75 contribution. or all five books in our collection, you can get all the books. the ford has a 4 by bill moyers, "breaking the sound barrier." the last is a book of the last three years of columns appearing in newspapers around the country. you can ask your newspaper to run it. the editorials are supposed to pay a vigorous dialogue. all five books together, all signed, yours for $200, and you have a library of books for yourselves, books to give for holidays
from whether or not if something can pass to really when it is. and i think that time is now. >> alexy, i appreciate you being on tonight, and colin as well. thank you very much. let's talk about the politics. so far they have included that nra ad, the congressional threat of impeachment. here to talk about it cnn contributor and consultant margaret hooper, charles below and david gergen. david, when you look at these proposals, are some of them non-starters? >> i think first of all, we have to say, anderson, many times in the past we have complained about a lack of leadership by president obama. this time he has stepped up. he is taking the lead. this is what a president who is really committed. >> he went big. >> he went big. you have to give him credit for that. his problem is that he is handicapped. he doesn't have enough power through the executive office to do this alone. most of these are small bore initiatives that he is going to do on his own. he needs the congress to get this done. and so far we have to bring politics into this, because this is a political matter in this trag
to meet our obligations. that's not who we are. major, then alexis. >> as you noted, jay, the situation in algeria is very fluid and you are trying to discern fact from fiction. once that process is finished, does the president intend to communicate with the country about what he knows and what has happened? >> well, i think -- i have no scheduling announcements to make on behalf of the president, and i think we're focused now on finding out and seeking clarity about the events in algeria. and once we know more and once we have more that we can convey to you, we'll make assessments based on that. >> does the white house believe that there is something at work in mali or algeria that is moving or shifting in a way that's maybe catching the american public's attention for the first time? threat patterns? different areas of conflict? an aggressiveness on al qaeda or affiliates that needs perhaps more communication with the american public, a greater sense of what's actually going on here? >> we here in the white house and throughout the administration are intensely focused on al qaeda and
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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